Bringing Home Your Puppy? Here's What To Do...

You’ve finally gotten the puppy you’ve been waiting for after (hopefully) weeks of research and lots of consideration - now it’s time to bring them home! Contact us today to learn more about the <a href="https://954puppies.com/puppies-for-sale/">puppies for sale</a> we have near Miami Florida!
The first few nights settling into a new home can be rough. The puppy, not used to the unfamiliar setting and new people, and without a puppy playmate, is likely to cry at night when it’s time to sleep and chew on things they shouldn’t. But getting into a set routine and preparing extensively for your puppy’s arrival to acclimate them as effectively as possible can certainly be done, and is key to raising a well-adjusted puppy.
Before bringing them home, you’re advised to follow these recommendations and steps:
Things to get
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Crate (wire or plastic)
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Pen/gate
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Leash, collar, harness
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Bowls
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Food
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Training treats
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Bed
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Urine stain remover (enzymatic cleanser)
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Toys (softer plastic/rubber non-edible chews are a good choice for teething)
Set up a plan, schedule, and rules
At this point, you’ll want to sit down and write out lots of details concerning your new puppy. This will save you a lot of time and stress in the long run, and your puppy confusion! If you’re not the only taking care of the puppy, you should fit the other caretakers down (whether they be family, friends, or roommates) and hash out details and scheduling. Organize a file folder for information from your puppy’s breeder or store, and one for veterinarian information too.
Decide on consistent feeding times, walking times, commands, vet plans, and house rules, like whether or not your puppy allowed to sit on the couch or bed with you. Write these details down as if you’re handing your puppy over to a pet sitter to watch for a few days.
Puppy-proofing your home
If you think preparing a house for a human baby is extensive, just wait until you have to start paying attention to your own home for a puppy! On top of getting into things they shouldn’t, puppies can also chew, eat, break, or pee on things they shouldn't. Minimize these effects by going through each section of your home and proofing it.
Amongst other things, you should be looking at things that can be easily knocked over or chewed on, like cables, vases, trash cans, foods, removes, or plants. Move them elsewhere (higher is better!) or remove them entirely.
Additionally, make sure that any inside plants you have aren’t poisonous to your puppy - a lot of unsuspecting species, such as poinsettias, are mild to severely harmful to animals. Move medication and chemicals into a sealed drawer high enough that your puppy can’t get into it.
You’ll want to get a crate or exercise pen, too, to section off a certain part of the home for when you can’t watch the puppy. Try to pick an area with a lot of traffic and easy-to-clean floors, so your puppy won’t feel alone or make hard-to-clean messes.
Introducing them to their new home
Your puppy is here!
Take them out immediately to pee or poop before bringing them inside and letting them explore the house - supervised, of course. Have any family members or friends sit down on the floor and introduce themselves gently as to not overwhelm them.
From then on, carry out the normal schedule you outlined beforehand and tire your puppy out with playtime or a walk before bedtime. Start winding them down before it’s time for bed by removing the water bowl, dimming the lights, and de-escalating the physical activity and attention.
Getting through the first night
You’ll seldom find a puppy who won’t make a peep through its first night home. Naturally, they are anxious at being alone and in an unfamiliar place and are likely to cry and whine when everyone is away and in bed. Set up their crate in a corner of your room, or just outside your door or bathroom so they know you’re not too far away.
Try your very hardest not to let the puppy out of the crate if they initially begin crying. Paying attention to their barks and whines will cause them to associate that behavior with humans coming to see them, and they’ll be more likely to do it. If they begin causing a fuss a few hours after bed, they probably need to go to the bathroom - at this point, it’s okay to get up and take them out to relieve themselves.
Putting a blanket over the crate to prevent them from seeing your movements is typically an effective way of quieting them down, as is including a treat-filled Kong toy or something similar to keep them busy until they fall asleep.
The first few days of having your puppy can be stress-inducing, but following a schedule and practicing a lot of patience will yield rewarding results and ensure your puppy is content and well-adjusted. Good luck! Contact us today to learn more about the <a href="https://954puppies.com/puppies-for-sale/">puppies for sale</a> we have near Miami Florida.

What comes included FREE with each of our puppies

Health Warranty
No Puppy Mill Promise
Health Certificate
Top Breeders
Exclusive Training Package
Transparent Online Pricing
Up to 100% Financing
Microchipped
Veterinary Perks & Discounts

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What comes included FREE with each of our puppies

Health Warranty
No Puppy Mill Promise
Health Certificate
Top Breeders
Exclusive Training Package
Transparent Online Pricing
Up to 100% Financing
Microchipped
Veterinary Perks & Discounts